AyurYoga Course part I

Presentation
AyurYoga part 1. of 4

According to  The Ayurvedic Consortium of Europe

Lecturers
Bapuji Kiran Vyas, Acharya Pankaj Vyas, Dr. Falguni Vyas, MUDr. Jan Šorf, Acharya Jan Vančura and Govindachraya Ji

Slides: 83

Chapter 1. Introduction
Meaning of AYoga and Ayurveda,
A few terminologies
History of Yoga and Ayurveda
Vedas, Upaveda, Upnishads, Darshan

Chapter 2. Yoga Darshan
Yoga Vashishtha
Patanjali YogaSutra
Ashtangayoga
Gheranda Samhita
Hatha Yoga Pradipika

Chapter 3. Sharira Rachna and Kriya
Panchakosha
Guna (Manoguna, Trigunas and Dravyaguna)
Mahabhutas
Tridosha
Dhatus
Agni
Prana

Tantra, Yantra, Ashaya, Srota

Chapter 4. Yogic and Ayurvedic phisiology
Prana
Nadis
Samghats

Chapter 5. Shathkarma
Dauti
Basti
Neti
Laukiki
Trataka
Kapalabhati

 

Muscular System of the Human body

Muscular System of the Human body
for AyurYoga and Dátá Snéhan

Authors: Bapu Ji Kiran Vyas et.al,
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA

email: info@ajur.cz
ISBN 978-80-906461-7-9
pages: 207,

Human life is very complex. It is composed of both perceptible and imperceptible components such as Samskara (the essence of one’s Karmas), Janma (birth characteristics/astrological factors), Mano Gunas (qualities of the mind), Chitta Vrittis (tendencies of the mind), Trigunas (Sattva, Rajas and Tamas), Dravya Guny (20 gunas), Mahabhuta (earth, water, fire, etc.), Tridoshas (Vata, Pitta, Kapha), Dhatus (ras, rakta, mamsa, etc.), molecular structures and organs (biochemical processes).

Whenever we touch the body, in fact we are stimulating all of these factors, visible and invisible. The purity of these components is a measure of human health. Impurities are due to imbalanced lifestyle. Impurities on the physical level emerge in the form of toxins in the tissues. These toxins cause diseases of the human body.

To understand complex body functions it is necessary to know the body’s abilities.

Muscles play an important role in taking physical action. We are emphasizing muscles here – but muscle alone cannot do anything.

Contents

An Introduction to the Muscular System, The Dhatus, Metabolism of the Dhatus, Metabolism, Mechanism of skeletal muscle, Sharira and Sharira vidhya, Germ layers, Mamsa dhatu, Mamsa dhatu sar prakriti,
Tridosha of Muscles, (Vatika Mamsa, Pitta Mamsa, Kapha Mamsa)
Muscular system and patterns, Muscle attachments

Axial muscles, Overview of the major skeletal muscles, Muscles of facial expression, Extrinsic eye muscles ,
Muscles of mastication, Muscles of the tongue, Muscles of the pharynx, Muscles of the neck,
Muscles of the vertebral column, Oblique and rectus muscles, Muscles of the pelvic floor, Appendicular muscles, An overview of the Appendicular muscles, Muscles that position the pectoral girdle, Muscles that move the arm, Muscles that move the forearm and hand, Muscles that move the hand and fingers, Muscles of the Pelvis and Lower Limbs, Muscles that move the thigh, Muscles that move the leg, Muscles that move the foot and toes

 

AyurYoga – Samghat and Asana

AYURYOGA
vol. Samghat and Asanas

Authors: Bapu Ji Kiran Vyas et.al,
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA

email: info@ajur.cz
ISBN 978-80-906461-7-9
pages: 207

Nowadays the publications on yoga are not scarce. On the contrary, quite a lot of published books cover a wide range of areas that are in the focus of yoga. Despite the yoga popularity, the connection of yoga and ayurveda is relatively neglected. Yoga and ayurveda, which not only have a common cultural and historical roots, but also the philosophical grounds and similar perception of the world and the life itself, are closely connected. This can be clearly perceived in the original texts in which the boundaries between these two systems sometimes almost disappear. You could even say that the two also discuss the same question, but each from a slightly different perspective. Therefore, the two choose a different approach and a different practical techniques.

The guide of yoga postures that you have in hand was created as a practical tool for students of ayur yoga: for those who make the effort to understand yoga and its techniques from the ayurveda perspective, as well as to understand how yoga can be used in ayurvedic diagnosis and treatment so that both form a comprehensive system. Although yoga is a complex system in which yoga postures, or asanas, constitute only one of its parts, this ayuryoga guide focuses primarily at them. The reason is the fact that asanas are relatively easy presented in a pictorial form and also because at the beginning of yoga studies asanas are often the very foundation of yoga practice. In the system of Raja Yoga only Yama and Niyama come before them. In hatha yoga, asanas are in the first place.

This atlas presents different asanas starting with the simple ones, preparing the body for more challenging postures, to those that already require some flexibility and strength. In addition to their name, the overall effect of each posture on the body and mind is mentioned. These specific asanas represent a comprehensive system in its own way, working gradually with all important parts of our body and preparing it for meditation postures.

We wish this Ayuryoga guide atlas has become a useful tool on your path of discovery.

Contents
Practice of Ayur-yoga, Mechanisms of movements, Hastha Samghat, Skandha samghat, Sampurna bhuja, Grivya samghat,
Trika-Kati samghat, Trika, Udara a Kati samghat, Kati Samghat, Kati-Janu Samghat, Gulfa Samghat.

The first cycle  – Vatamuktasana, Prana dhyanam, Streching the  U L, Streching the  L L, Kati samghat kshetra, Streching UL and LL, Streching L/R , UL and LL, Bhunamanasana. Bhuja kshetra, Amsa, skanda and koshtha kshetra, Koshthanga kshetra, Exercise for sensory organs, Setuasana

The Second cycle  – Sarvangasanadi: Urdhavapadasana, Sarvangasana, Halasana, Karnapídasana, Matsjasana

The Third cycle  – cakrasanadi: Ardhacakrasana, cakrasana, Naukasana

The Fourth cycle – Natrajasanadi: Natarajasana, Pavanamuktasana, Eka Hasta Padasana, Makarasana

The Fifth cycle – Marjariasanadi: Sarpasana, shalabhasana, Dhanurasana, Bhujangasana, shashankasana, Marjari-asana, Meruasana, Vajrasana

The Sixth cycle – Virbhadrasana: Ushtrasana, Vírasana, Vírabhadrasana, Súptavajrasana, Gomukhasana

The Seventh cycle – Pashcimottanasana: Pashcimóttanasana, Matsjendrasana, Dhanurbanasana

The eight cycle – Uttishtha krama: Tadasan, Vírbhadrasan, Surya namaskara, Trikonasana, Kati-cakrasana, Bakasana, Mayurasana, shirshasana

The Ninth cycle – Dhyanasanadi: Padmasana, Sukhasana

Ayurveda Awareness

Presentation
AYURVEDA WARENESS

Volume: Philosophy, Tridosha and Dhatus
Authors: Dr. Govind Rajpoot Ph.D, Bapu Ji Kiran Vyas, Dr. Mauroof M. Athique
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA

email: info@university-ayurveda.com
ISBN 978-80-906461-6-2

Format: 175 slides


Ayurveda Awareness – I. Philosophy

Ayurveda is very ancient knowledge of life, it causes, factors, parts, influences, mechanism, style and nature. It is emerged from Vedas the oldest text in the human mind. The Time has been bringing constantly changes in the material form of space. But the knowledge (the ayurveda) remains same with no change from several thousand years. Ayurveda has been property of the great Yogis, Ayurveda is the quality and knowledge of a Yogi. Without understanding factors of the life neither Yoga nor Ayurveda could be understood. In the Firts part of Ayurveda awareness course, these factors are included.

Ayurveda Awareness – II. Tridosha

The word Tridosha is well known to people who know little Ayurveda as a typology of human body. This is a very quick application of ayurveda. It is danger, because Ayurveda concerns with all factors responsible for life. Vat Pitta Kapha are not root causes but just tools for physiology. Root of life is in Manogunas, Manovritties, Trigunas, which subsequently select dravya guna or grurvadi guna, whose selection of of Mahabhutas are termed as Vata, Pitta,  Kapha.  To use these terminology one must be aware of their characteristics, genesis and factors. In the Second part of Ayurveda awareness course, the Tridosha are explained.

Ayurveda Awareness – III. Dhatu

Human physiology is very simple and logical in Ayurveda. Body is something that holds life. It is generated in accordance to purpose of life. Sometime human mind is not capable to understand simple principles. What we like in the body is the function, not the structure, because even the structure is consequence of function. If there is no function of life, the body is dead and nobody likes dead body at home. So the life function is visible in the body for a person who percept by thinking and those who percept the live body by optical eyes may observe actions and reactions of the human body, to what we call wrtting a protocal of observation of morphology, experiment and habits,

Word Dhatu mean that which carry life. Very frequently, it is translated as tissues, but once we pronounce the word tissue we think of visible structure and do not think of its genesis. If one could understand the word “tissue” as functional unit and the function is life factors (thinking, feeling, emotions, nutrition, wishes, sleep, speech, like, dislike etc.) than the word tissue can be used as a translation of the word “Dhatu”. We can say, Dhatu is philosophy of human physiology.

Study of Dhatu includes understanding of human body parts such as  body fluids, temperature, color, muscles, fibers, bones, bone morrow, reproductive tissues  vitality, power, etc.

Topics are presented in the form of slide presentation, One may need Ayurveda Teacher to explain the slides. For that you may contact your nearest teacher, or if you are in Europe, please contact to www.university-ayurveda.com, www.tapovan.com

 

Marma therapy

MARMA THERAPY

Author: Dr Govind Rajpoot PhD
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA
email: info@university-ayurveda.com

pages: 132,

Massage of the energy points in the body that are important to life is called marma massage.
The human body is a very compact network of fine and thick shrotas (channels). The body is intended for certain physical activity, and in order to be able to perform it, the infrastructure of the shrotas. In this network there are certain points that are more sensitive to the flow of the vital energy, especially to the pran vayu, the main conveyor of life. This is why Sushrut wrote that these points are very sensitive. Damaging these places can cause death, disability, or disease. When there is a blockage in the flow of the life force, it can cause dysfunction in the physiological systems associated with that point.
This course provides instruction in how to heal these vital points through marma massage therapy.

 

ATLAS DÁTÁ SNEHAN MASSAGE

ATLAS
DÁTÁ SNEHAN MASSAGE

Ayurvedic Therapy for Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles and Joints

Author: Dr Govind Rajpoot PhD
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA
email: info@university-ayurveda.com

pages: 127,



In Ayurveda, there are two main types of treatments. One is shamanam (pacification of dosha) and another is shodhanam (cleansing of dosha). Panchakarma is the main techinique for the shodhanam. But to apply the Panchakarma, body should be well prepared which means tridosha should be balanced in the body. In ancient Indian culture, balancing the tridhoshas was part of the daily life system. But in modern times when the body is cultured by civilized manners (cars, sofa, table and chair, beds etc.), Vata is usually disordered, therefore even Panchakarma is not applicable directly. Firstly, It is important to remove excess Vata from the body. For this purpose, our Guru Dátá has developed this techinque of massage. It was first used by wrestlers who needed their body in perfect condition. But the author found this technique useful for people of these modern times, especially western cultured people (now including Indians). This technique is indicated for Vata disorders in muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints for a perfect mobility of the body. Dátá Snéhan Massage uses Hatha-Yoga postures and several different methods for stretching and relaxation. The technique requires knowledge of Ayurveda and anatomy as well as common sense.

The body is comprised of cells and intercellular spaces through which nutrients flow with the aid of Vata through the intercellular channels (shrotas). Disorders of Vata disrupt the balance of cellular life and the tissues and the person does not feel well. This kind of massage (dátá snehan) was developed for the purpose of removing Vata from the channels.
The most overloaded parts of the body are the joints, the ligaments, the muscles and the tendons. What is needed to alleviate Vata disorders is that the tissues be stretched, within the framework of their given capacities, through knowledge of structural anatomy and yoga positions. In addition, the opposite qualities of Vata (snigda, ushna, tikshna, etc.) are used to alleviate the disorders.

Dátá Snéhan Massage – Book

AYURVEDIC MASSAGE
DÁTÁ SNEHAN

Ayurvedic Therapy for Ligaments, Tendons, Muscles and Joints

Author: Dr Govind Rajpoot PhD
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA
email: info@university-ayurveda.com

pages: 158,



In Ayurveda, there are two main types of treatments. One is shamanam (pacification of dosha) and another is shodhanam (cleansing of dosha). Panchakarma is the main techinique for the shodhanam. But to apply the Panchakarma, body should be well prepared which means tridosha should be balanced in the body. In ancient Indian culture, balancing the tridhoshas was part of the daily life system. But in modern times when the body is cultured by civilized manners (cars, sofa, table and chair, beds etc.), Vata is usually disordered, therefore even Panchakarma is not applicable directly. Firstly, It is important to remove excess Vata from the body. For this purpose, our Guru Dátá has developed this techinque of massage. It was first used by wrestlers who needed their body in perfect condition. But the author found this technique useful for people of these modern times, especially western cultured people (now including Indians). This technique is indicated for Vata disorders in muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints for a perfect mobility of the body. Dátá Snéhan Massage uses Hatha-Yoga postures and several different methods for stretching and relaxation. The technique requires knowledge of Ayurveda and anatomy as well as common sense.

The body is comprised of cells and intercellular spaces through which nutrients flow with the aid of Vata through the intercellular channels (shrotas). Disorders of Vata disrupt the balance of cellular life and the tissues and the person does not feel well. This kind of massage (dátá snehan) was developed for the purpose of removing Vata from the channels.
The most overloaded parts of the body are the joints, the ligaments, the muscles and the tendons. What is needed to alleviate Vata disorders is that the tissues be stretched, within the framework of their given capacities, through knowledge of structural anatomy and yoga positions. In addition, the opposite qualities of Vata (snigda, ushna, tikshna, etc.) are used to alleviate the disorders.
This massage technique teaches how to stretch the body and cleanse the channels.
This study requires basic knowledge of structural anatomy and yoga positions and the desire to perform massage.

Ashtanga Hridayam 1a

Title: Interpretation of the ASHTANGARIDAYAM 1a

Volume: 1a/20 SUTRASTHAN (1)
Author: Dr Govind Rajpoot PhD
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA

email: info@university-ayurveda.com
ISBN 978-80-906461-2-4
Format: B5 (ISO),  pages: 160,

 


This book is an interpretation of the first part (Sutrasthan) of a classic work of Ayurveda known as the Astanga-hrida-samhita (Astanga Hridayam, Astanghridayam). The author is known as Acharya Vagbhatta, Date of work is unclear but deducted in Buddhist era.

Vāgbhatta (वाग्भट) is one of the most impressive classical writers of Ayurveda. Astangahridayam makes frequent reference to the earlier classical works, the Charaka Samhita and the Sushruta Samhita. Sushruta is considered as one of the earliest surgeons, Charaka as a medical genius, and Vagbhata is considered to be “The Trinity” of Ayurvedic knowledge.

Vāgbhata is suppose to have lived in Sind (today in Pakistan) and to have been the son of Simhagupta and pupil of Avalokita (buddhist monk). Astangahridayam originally written in Sanskrit language.

The Aṣṭangahrydayam is written in poetic language,
in 7120 easily understood Sanskrit verses that present a coherent account of Ayurvedic knowledge.
Ashtanga in Sanskrit means „eight components“ and Hridayam means „heart“. Astanga refers to the eight sections of Ayurveda: internal medicine, surgery, gynecology and paediatrics, rejuvenation therapy, aphrodisiac therapy, toxicology, and psychiatry or spiritual healing, and ENT (ear, nose and throat). There are sections on longevity, personal hygiene, the causes of illness, the influence of season and time on the human organism, types and classifications of medicine, the significance of the sense of taste, pregnancy and possible complications during birth, Prakriti, individual constitutions and various aids for establishing a prognosis. There is also detailed information on Five-actions therapies (pancakarma) including therapeutically induced vomiting, the use of laxatives, enemas, complications that might occur during such therapies and the necessary medications.

Evidently it was not widely read in early times. However, the Astangahridayam has come to new prominence since the twentieth century through being made part of the curriculum for ayurvedic education worldwide.

This book is a interpretation of the first four chapters of the first section, the “Sutrasthana”, which is dedicated to the general principles of the art of Ayurveda, with a commentary by Ayurvedacharya Govind Ji for western readers.

Chapter 1

Desire for long life, origin of ayurveda, eight branches of ayurveda, Tridosha, types of digestion, about body, tridosha qualities, Dhatu a mala (body tissues and waste products), six tastes, Alleviation of doshas through tastes, potency (virya), vipaka, causes of disease and health, definition of health and disease, patient examination, types of environment, Types of kala – time, types of therapy, general recommendation on healing physical and psychic illnesses, Treatment of mental disorders, four factors of treatment), qualities of patient, Patients unfit for treatment, list of the chapters in Ashtanga hrdayam.

Chapter 2

Dinacharya – daily regimen, teeth cleaning, Andjana, Nasya and gandusha, contraindications to betel chewing, Abhyang, exercise, Massage after exercise, Udvartana – paste massage, bath,

Eating habits and so forth, Wise words, ten sins, Proper behaviour,

Personal hygiene and appereance, Personal accessories, Warning when walking, Proper behavior code, Alcohol, What to avoid, Importance of teacher in life , Good man, Think dispassionately.

Chapter 3

Six seasons (in india), Adan kala (uttarayana), Visarga kala, body strength in different seasons, Hemanta ritu lakshana – Regime of different seasons winter, Spring, Greeshma, rainy season etc.

Chapter 4

Body urges not to be suppressed, Apan vayu suppression – illnesses and treatment,

Suppression of stool and urine (purish-mutra rodh), sneezing (chhik rodh), thirst (trashna rodh), hunger (kshudha rodh), lack of sleep and their treatment.Diseases arising from cough suppression (khas rodh), Diseases arising from suppression of lost breath after physical activity (kshram-shvas rodh), Suppression of yawning (zdzrambha rodh), tears (ashru), vomiting (chhradi rodh), sperm (shukra-veg rodh). Importance of shodhana (impurities removal), Shodhanottar rasayana – nourishing after removal
of doshas and malas, Shodhanottar upchar – recommendations, following the removal of doshas and malas, Agantu of disease – deaseases from external reasons, Treatment for nij and agantu diseases, Removing the seasonal influence, Recommendation for life without disease.

 

Sushruta Samhita – 3a

SUSHRUTA SAMHITA Part IIIa

Sharira Sthanam, Chapters 1-5

Authors: Dr. Govind Rajpoot Ph.D

First edition: 2016

Publisher: Ayurvedachrya Publication, Czech Republic

ISBN: ISBN 978-80-906461-1-7

info@university-ayurveda.com

Pages 204, Format B5

Indian culture understands the mind, spirituality, karma, dharma, morality, the purpose of life, incarnation, behavior, psychosomatics, yoga, mantras, meditation, prayer and interpersonal relationships differently than European culture does. Literature written by Indian authors, like the Sushruta Samhita, was intended for the Indian way of thinking. Indian people acquire a basic awareness of Ayurveda during their upbringing in their culture, and many facts are considered to be a matter of course to them. These treatises do not discuss that basic awareness or those facts, because they presume the reader already knows them. When this literature is studied by a European student doing his or her best to understand it through European logic without that basic information, the student will have trouble understanding it. In this book we have done our best to explain the meaning of the individual sutras from the perspective of a European reader.

Sushruta Samhita (सुश्रुतसंहिता), which literally translates as “Sushrut’s Handbook”, is a work that was originally written in Sanskrit and discusses the physiology of the human body. This treatise is significant thanks to its detailed description of surgery in ancient times. Sushruta Samhita is a component of the instruction of Ayurveda at Ayurvedic universities.

The age of this work is unclear. Some authors date it to 3 000 BCE, others to 1 000 BCE, etc. Sushrut, in the third section of his work, writes about the functional and structural anatomy of the human body, which is a very important, interesting topic for beginning Ayurveda students.

This book aims primarily to aid students with comprehending this philosophical approach to how the human body is created. It contains the first five chapters of the work entitled the Sharira Sthana (the discussion of the human body in the Sushruta Samhita), as follows:

Chapter 1 – On the philosophy of the creation of life
Introduction to the causal factors of life, the origin of it all, the process of its creation, the 24 elements of life, the 25th element, characteristics of purusha and prakrti, recognizing an Ayurvedic practitioner, senses and sense objects, characteristics of mind, characteristics of the triguna, characteristics of the mahabhutas, the mahabhutas and the trigunas.

Chapter 2 – On the quality of the eggs and sperm, menstruation and sex
Introduction to reproduction, impaired sperm, disorders of sperm, disorders of menstruation, basic solutions to sperm disorders, characteristics of healthy sperm and of disordered vs. healthy menstruation, strong menstruation, weak menstruation, behavior of women during the menstrual period, first encounter with the husband, rules for the husband’s behavior, conception and the phase of the moon, contraindications for conception during menstruation, recipe to influence the sex of the child, conditions for conception, causes of various colorations of the child, influence of deviations on conception, offspring with abnormalities, five kinds of impotence, lack of discipline in sex, warning for those who are pregnant, physiology of the embryo, influence of the past life.

Chapter 3 – On conception and pregnancy
Introduction to pregnancy, conception, the diploid zygote and Atma, predetermination of the sex of the offspring, characteristics of a fertile woman, opening and shutting of the uterus, menstrual periods, sex of the offspring, signs of recent conception, signs of pregnancy, inappropriate behavior during pregnancy, the risky fourth month in the development of the embryo, embryonic development, two hearts, the desires of a pregnant woman, development of the embryo month by month, nutrition of the embryo, different opinions about the creation of the embryo’s body, factors individually determined by the principles of fatherhood and motherhood, signs that the embryo is female or male.

Chapter 4 – On the development of the embryo and its constitution
This chapter is about the structure of the embryo and its development, the definition of prana, the composition of the skin, the packaging of the organs, the kala (membranes), the mamsadhara-kala (fascie), development of the blood vessels, raktadhara-kala, medodhara-kala, shleshmadhara-kala, purishdhara-kala, maladhara-kala, pittadhara-kala, the four ways of intaking nutrients, shukradhara-kala, shukra dhatu, orifices – artava, pliha (the spleen) and yakrt (the liver), the creation of organs (organogenesis), the heart, sleep and its characteristics, indications and contraindications for sleeping during the day, sleeping during the day, addressing insomnia, excessive sleep, drowsiness, causes of loss of consciousness, vertigo and sleep, growth of the embryo, vata and pitta of the embryo, seven kinds of prakrti, vata prakrti, pitta prakrti, kapha prakrti, prakrti of two or three doshas, changes to prakrti, various kinds of typology of prakrti, sattvic characteristics, rajasic characteristics, tamasic characteristics.

Chapter 5 – On the characteristics of the physical body
Introduction to parts of the body, definition of the body and the embryo, various parts of the body, internal parts of the body, number of parts of the body, already-described parts of the body, ashaya – organs containing fluids or solids, kandara – ligaments, djala – plaits, kurcha – bundles of ligaments and rajja – large flat muscles, sevani – seams, asthi sanghat – mobile connections of the bones, simant – immobile connections of the bones, asthi – bones, number of bones, kinds of bones, bones are the sar (base and root) of the body, sandhi – connects the bones and cartilage, eight kinds of connections between the bones and cartilage, countless connections, enumeration of the snayus – tendons, kinds of snayus – tendons, kinds of peshas – muscles, women have 20 muscles more than men, characteristics and forms of the muscles, uterus and vagina, meaning of salya tantra – surgery, characteristics of the dead body appropriate for autopsy.

Caraka Samhita 1a

Interpretation of the CHARKA SAMHITA

Interpretation of the CHARAKA SAMHITA
Volume: SUTRASTHAN (1A)

Author: Dr Govind Rajpoot PhD
Publisher: AYURVEDACHARYA
ISBN 978-80-906461-0-0

email: info@university-ayurveda.com

pages: 372,


The Charaka Samhita is the oldest literature in the world on health and on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. It was first translated into Arabic and Hebrew. The original literature is written in Sanskrit in the Devanagari script. This literature, which is thousands of years old, is very hard for the general European reader to understand today. 

Ayuvedacharya Dr. Rajpoot has lived in Europe for 27 years and has learned about the European way of thinking during this time. He explains the Charaka Samhita very clearly, using examples from present-day European culture, so that today’s reader can comprehend it.

The Charaka Samhita will be published in translation with commentary by Dr. Rajpoot in 12 volumes. This is part A of Volume 1, which has 16 chapters, as follows:

Chapter 1: human beings, consciousness, dharma, manifestation and stagnation of the gunas, silence, body and mind, Tridosh, Ras and its enormous force, Tastes affect the doshas, medicines, Virechan, vomiting, laxatives, fruits, fats, salts, urine, milk etc.

Chapter 2: Ingredients for nasya oil, inhalation, inducing vomiting, fat free enema, snehan, svedan, appetite and alleviating colic, digesting, diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, urination, parasites, thirst, weight gain or loss, lubricate, flatulence, sore throat, lethargy, to suppress appetite, panchkarma medicines.

Chapter 3: Mixtures for preparing ointment, alleviating itching, impetigo, ameliorating skin disease, Ubtan and abhyang oils, bdominal pain, gout or vatarakt, headache, back pain, burning sensation, removing toxins, excess sweating, eliminating body odor,

Chapter 4: classification of herbs

Chapter 5: Food, amounts of food, digestion, digestive force , andjana, inhalation, smoking technique, nasal procedure, cleaning the oral cavity, Gandusha – swishing oil in the mouth, dripping oil into the ears, Abhyang, oil massage, Foot massage etc.

Chapter 6: diet, Ahar and vihar, The six seasons, Visarg and adan kal,

Chapter 7: Disorders that come from suppressing natural needs, urinate, excrete stool, sperms, gas, vomiting, sneezing, burping, yawning, hunger, thirst, tears, sleep, breathing, speak. Act according to dharma, artha and karma. Physical exercise etc.

Chapter 8: The sense organs, Chitta, mind, three gunas, happiness and unhappiness, Sense organs and the mahabhuts, Correct behavior,

Chapter 9: The four qualities of the Ayurvedic practitioner, dravya, assistant and invalid

Chapter 10: Successfulness of the Ayurvedic practitioner, Kind of maladies, characteristics of curable and incurable diseases etc.

Chapter 11: Desires, Atma, Realization, Definition of an Ayurvedic practitioner, Pratyaksha, Anumana, Sanyog, Yukti, Reincarnation, Senses and disease, Pragyaparadha, Kinds of maladies

Chapter 12: Vata dosha

Chapter 13: Lubricants and lubrication, animal, plant sneh (oils),Ghee , Madjdja, Bone marrow

Chapter 14: Hot provedures: warm pouch, sauna, steam svedan with the aid of a hose, broth bath, Agni sanskar, heating on a bed, heating through sprinkling, heating using a pit, circular room, heating with the aid of the earth, another kind of heating etc.

Chapter 15: Rules of procedures, Equipment, vaman and virechan procxedures.

Chapter 16: Ayurvedic practitioner, Indications for vaman and virechan

 ________________________________________________-